Backs Against the Wall: The Howard Thurman Story (Emmy Award Winner)
       
     
Introduction and Moderator of Panel for Film Release of ‘If Beale Street Could Talk,’
       
     
The Growing Edge Podcast conversation with Parker and Carrie
       
     
Awakin.Org Podcast (750,000 international followers)
       
     
       
     
       
     
       
     
       
     
Backs Against the Wall: The Howard Thurman Story (Emmy Award Winner)
       
     
Backs Against the Wall: The Howard Thurman Story (Emmy Award Winner)

I am honored to be one of the contributors to speak about the life and impact of Howard Thurman on American History. Other contributors include: Congressman John Lewis, Jesse L. Jackson, Sr., Vernon E. Jordan, Jr., Barbara Brown Taylor, Luther Smith, Jesse Jackson, Otis Moss, Jr., Otis Moss III, Anton Wong, Alton B. Pollard III, Walter Earl Fluker, Peter Eisenstadt, Lerita Coleman Brown, Eileen Guenther, and Lawerence Edward Carter, Sr.

To watch the film in its entirety: https://www.pbs.org/video/backs-against-the-wall-the-howard-thurman-story-cgv9gi/

Introduction and Moderator of Panel for Film Release of ‘If Beale Street Could Talk,’
       
     
Introduction and Moderator of Panel for Film Release of ‘If Beale Street Could Talk,’

James Baldwin and the Power of Story: A Prelude to Viewing Barry Jenkins’ rendition of ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’

Stories

Stories have the power to frame our daily living,

to pattern our future.

Stories have the capacity to inform values,

shape beliefs, and craft culture.

But, what happens when a community is not

afforded the space or the platform to share their

story?

When lacking the opportunity to share one’s

story, values can be deformed, beliefs can be

misshapen, and stereotypes can toxify a culture.

For this reason we give thanks for those fearless

enough to share the narrative arc of a people

pushed to the margins of the American Story.

In an essay penned in 1951 entitled, “Many

Thousands Gone,” James Baldwin articulates

the necessity of moving the Negro’s story from

margin to center. With his signature clarity and

precision of words, Baldwin explains:

The story of the Negro in America is the story of

America— or, more precisely, it is the story of

Americans. It is not a very pretty story: The story

of the people is never pretty. The Negro in

America, gloomily referred to as the shadow

which lies athwart our national life, is far more

than that. There’s is a series of shadows, self

created, intertwining, which now we helplessly

battle. One may say that the Negro in America

does not really exist except in the shadow of our

minds.

On this day, we celebrate an artist who used

“Moonlight” to illumine the stories of a people who

are far too often cast in the shadows of

American consciousness.

We anticipate the performance of brilliant

storytellers who were challenged to lift

Baldwin’s words off the page so that we might

see ourselves, our communities, our country

more clearly.

For this feat of bringing James Baldwin to the

public so that this story might inform our values,

shape our beliefs, and craft our culture, we say

thank you.

Without further adieu… “If Beale Street Could Talk.”

Barry Jenkins

Regina King

Colman Domingo

KiKi Layne

A native of Miami and a graduate of Florida

State University,Barry Jenkins is an acclaimed

film director, producer, and screenwriter who is

based in Los Angeles. He is known for his films

Medicine for Melancholy (2008) and Moonlight

(2016), which received dozens of accolades,

including the Academy Award for Best Picture

as well as Best Adapted Screenplay, which

Jenkins shared with co-writer Tarell Alvin

McCraney.

The Growing Edge Podcast conversation with Parker and Carrie
       
     
Awakin.Org Podcast (750,000 international followers)
       
     
Awakin.Org Podcast (750,000 international followers)
       
     
2019 Howard Thurman Documentary and Panel discussion 4-3-19
       
     
Rev. Dr. Gregory C. Ellison, II Q & A
       
     
Rev. Dr. Greg Ellison & Georgette Ledgister on Fear
       
     
Cut Dead But Still Alive: Caring for African American Young Men - Rev. Dr. Gregory Ellison, II